New Orleans register of free people of color, 1840-1864 by Judy Riffel

Cover of: New Orleans register of free people of color, 1840-1864 | Judy Riffel

Published by Le Comité des Archives de la Louisiane in Baton, Rouge, LA .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Free African Americans -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- History -- 19th century -- Registers,
  • African Americans -- Louisiana -- New Orleans -- Genealogy,
  • Registers of births, etc. -- Louisiana -- New Orleans,
  • New Orleans (La.) -- Genealogy

Edition Notes

Includes index.

Book details

Statementcompiled and edited by Judy Riffel.
GenreRegisters, Genealogy
Classifications
LC ClassificationsF379.N59 N4 2008
The Physical Object
Paginationvi, 234 p. ;
Number of Pages234
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23223212M
LC Control Number2008911197

Download New Orleans register of free people of color, 1840-1864

The item New Orleans register of free people of color,compiled and edited by Judy Riffel represents a specific, individual, material embodiment of a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in East Baton Rouge Parish Library.

Collections from the Louisiana Division of New Orleans Public Library: Register of free persons of color entitled to remain in the state, 4 volumes.

Each volume lists the name of the person registering, sex and color, age, profession, place of birth, time of arrival in the state (or date of emancipation), and "observations" or "remarks.".

Get this from a library. Register of free colored persons entitled to remain in state, [New Orleans. Mayor's Office.]. New Orleans Register of Free People of Color, By Judy Riffel Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Le Comité des Archives de la Louisiane, Soft cover, pages, full-name index from.

The Free People of Color of New Orleans book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. This ground breaking book, first published in /5(7).

This project will digitize significant collections of public records from the New Orleans Public Library's Louisiana Division, including a New Orleans register of free people of color "Register of free persons of color entitled to remain in the state" (), four different collections of emancipation records, which often include testimony regarding why the slave was.

Free people of color who were not born in the City of New Orleans, or who were born in the Parish of Orleans and were emancipated after birth, were required to register with the Mayor's Office as free people of register as a whole is comprised of four.

The Free People of Color of Pre-Civil War New Orleans Before American concepts of race took hold in the newly-acquired Louisiana, early 19th-century New Orleans had large population of free people of color.

Creole in a Red Turban by Jacques Aman, c. New Orleans Register of Free People of Color, by Judy Riffel - pages soft cover Register of free people of color in the city of New Orleans providing name, sex, color, age, identifying marks, profession, place of birth, time of arrival, date of registration, and legal references to freedom.

Includes full-name index. The term free people of color (French: gens de couleur libres), in the context of the history of slavery in the Americas, at first specifically referred to persons of partial African and European.

At the time of the Louisiana Purchase inat least one in six of the roughly 8, people living in New Orleans was a free person of color. The city's population, both white and black, increased significantly between and due to an influx of émigrés displaced by the Haitian Revolution (led by Toussaint Louverture, a free man of.

Free people of color played an important role in the history of New Orleans and the southern area of New France, both when the area was controlled by the French and Spanish, and after its acquisition by the United States New Orleans register of free people of color part of the Louisiana Purchase.

When French settlers and traders first arrived in these colonies, the men frequently took Native American women as their concubines or. Categories: Free People of Color (FPOC), Genealogy, Slavery This is the colonial census of free men of color (mulâtre and nègre) for the civil and military post of Opélousas, dated May I have retained the original spellings in the document to serve as additional variations in names of these individuals.

Free women of color not only constituted a majority among free colored people in the state but among the female real property owners in this group in the Lower South, three out of four lived in Louisiana and a near majority in New Orleans.

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Kim Coleman, 29, a curator at the museum whose grandmother was. Records Relating to Free People of Color and Freedmen New Orleans (La.) Office of the Mayor. Register of Free Persons of Color Entitled to Remain in the State, Library ID (No Spaces!) or EZ Username Phone (Last four digits) or EZ Password.

Remember Me (lasts for 2 weeks, or until you log out). New Orleans annual and commercial register of Containing the names, residences and professions of all the heads of families and persons in business of the city and suburbs, Algiers and Lafayette, &c by Michel & Co., New Orleans, pub.

The Free People of Color of New Orleans An Introduction (Book): Gehman, Mary. Record book of licenses issued to peddlers, ; and of deserters from ships in the ports of New Orleans, Register of free persons of color entitled to remain in the state, Messages to the Council, ; Letter books,   Louisiana Statewide Online Genealogy Records.

This chart shows links to statewide collections. To find links to collections for lower jurisdictions (such as a county or town), go to Locating Online Databases., and can be searched free of charge at your local family history center or the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

For instance, the Register of Free Colored Persons Entitled to Remain in State, may include individuals with the LaFargue surname. You could order these records on microfilm and view them. After the Federals took New Orleans inthe city's men of color, jointly with newly freed slaves, composed the first colored regiment of the Federal army.

Louisiana furnished more colored troops for the war than any other State, but the majority of them were freedmen, who in the general population far outnumbered the free person of color.

The register consists of free Negroes and transfers by sale or gift. Jackson: Register of Free Negroes, ; and Praecipe Book, Pendleton: Registry of Free Negroes and Mullatos, Putnam: Negro Register, Record of the status of Black people as found in the back of a summons volume.

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Categories: Free People of Color (FPOC), Identity, Law T. The very first state legislative session in Louisiana passed this act in New Orleans on 27 th. July It formed the legal basis for the organization of militias composed of free men of color (of all complexions)–who were Creoles–after Louisiana’s entry into the union of states in Faithfully furnished with domestic goods, decorative arts and art of the period, the House depicts middle class family life during the most prosperous period in New Orleans' history.

Limited docent- and curator-led tours are available as is self-directed Museum gift shop, operated by the Friends of the Cabildo, is located in. The history of free people of color in New Orleans is deeply rooted in the European colonial competition of the eighteenth century.

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